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Will an out-of-state DUI transfer to my home state?


A

Question: I just got a DUI in a state other than my state of residence. I have heard that speeding tickets often will not transfer over and raise insurance if they are received in another state. Will this DUI transfer to my home state motor vehicle report? If so, will it force me to get SR-22 insurance?

Answer: Most states have reciprocal agreements with each other or have otherwise have decided to share traffic violation convictions that were received out-of-state back to the licensing state of the driver who received the citation. This can be for a minor offense such as a speeding ticket, or a major offense such as a DUI.

The main reciprocal agreements with regards to traffic violations are the Drivers License Compact (DLC) and Non-Resident Violator Compact (NRVC). There are states that do not take part in any of these compacts, but most have their own separate agreements that their Motor Vehicle administration has made with other states to still share information.

Basically, all states try to share information about minor or major traffic violations that you receive out of state back with your home licensing state.

As a member of the DLC member states are required to report ticket convictions received by a motorist back to the state where they are licensed to drive. Their own state then determines if this offense will be placed on their driving record and if any points will be assessed.

The members of the DLC: include Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

This leaves the states of Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee and Wisconsin as non-members, though most of these states still have their own agreements with other states to exchange information regarding traffic violation convictions.

The Non-Resident Violator Compact (NRVC) requires member states to suspend the drivers license of those who get traffic tickets for moving violations in other states and fail to pay them or otherwise legally take care of them.

Members of the NRVC include: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

This leaves the states of Alaska, California, Michigan, Montana, Oregon and Wisconsin that are not members of the NRVC. Again, these states may have their own agreements though with other states and may still suspend or penalize a driver that does not pay their out of state ticket.

There is also the National Driver Register (NDR) that all states and the District of Columbia report information "problem drivers" to.

The NDR contains records on those who have had their licenses revoked or suspended, or who have been convicted of serious traffic violations (i.e. DUI) throughout the United States. So due to this national database if you have received a DUI in one state any other state in the United States will be able to see that you were convicted of this major offense.

When a person applies for a driver's license or goes to renew their license the state DMV should check to see if that driver's name is on the NDR file. If that person has been reported to the NDR as a problem driver, a license may be denied until the issue has taken care of and their license has been reinstated in the state that has the hold on their license.

For information on what states your home state shares information with, check with your Department of Motor Vehicles. If you got a DUI out-of-state, then likely your home state will be informed by the state in which you were convicted of the drunk driving charge. And many states will once they are informed of the DUI place it on your driving record and may even apply penalties to you as if the DUI was from in state. So your home state may suspend your license or require a SR-22.

It may take some time for this violation to appear on your driving record; however, the DUI is most likely going to get on there eventually.

As for the SR22 insurance, this will depend upon the laws of the state in which you received the DUI and your home state's laws if you will have to obtain this certificate of financial responsibility or not.

If the state in which you received the DUI requires it, then you'll need to find an insurer in your home state to insure you for the required insurance coverages and limits the other state is requiring plus the insurer will need to be authorized in the other state to file the SR-22 for you there.

You can obtain state car insurance rates here. If you find out that you need a SR-22, either for the state where the DUI occurred or in your home state, then currently the best way to obtain an SR-22 filing is by contacting our call center toll-free at 1-855-430-7658. Our agents will help you obtain a quote for the coverage you need.

We work with insurers such as Direct General, Esurance, Infinity, Progressive and QBE for SR-22 filings. Not all insurance companies do business in all states, though.  Most companies can provide immediate proof of insurance via e-mail or fax. Processing of SR-22 requests depends mostly on whether your state accepts filings electronically.


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3 Responses to "Will an out-of-state DUI transfer to my home state?"
  1. Visitor

    Great information. Thanks!

      Reply»  
  2. Anonymous

    Thanks for the information.

      Reply»  
  3. Anonymous

    it aswered my question.

      Reply»