dcsimg
Call Us Toll Free: 1-855-430-7753

Q&A

See if your question's been answered
Looking for more answers? Find advice to
commonly asked questions from our team
of insurance experts.

Q

Is there a national data base that insurance companies utilize to track accidents? If a collision is not reported to the police, yet your provider pays off, will another provider have the ability to know if you were involved in a collision? Short of you informing them.


A

Yes, insurance companies do have a national database that informs them if you have had prior claims paid through your insurance policy. If there were claims made due to you being at-fault in the accidents then the auto insurance company would have records of this in the form of your claims history and through the CLUE report.

CLUE is an acronym for Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange. C.L.U.E.® is a registered trademark of ChoicePoint Asset Company. This report is a national insurance industry database of claims. A CLUE report shows all claims reported to the insurance company for the house or motor vehicle, depending upon which CLUE report you are looking at, over the past five years.

Even if you change insurance companies your claims history can be looked up any insurance company by using the Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange (CLUE) database. Through the CLUE personal auto claims report an insurance company can receive a person's 5 year history of auto insurance losses.

How the CLUE database works is that insurance companies feed information about property loss claims, even inquiries about coverage, into a central database. So any claims filed against your auto insurance policy for losses would be placed into this national database where another provider other than your own could see it.

The CLUE report thus could show any new insurer information about any claims you filed under your previous insurer's policy. CLUE can also include information about inquiries you make, even if a claim was never submitted or paid.

Your CLUE report will include date of the loss, the type of loss claimed and amount paid by the insurance company for the loss. If you want to know what is on your CLUE report that other insurance companies can see you can order your own copy.

Under the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, CLUE reports can only be accessed by the owner, insurer or lender for a specific property. As the owner of a property (house or car), you can order a CLUE report. Under the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act you can request a copy of your property's CLUE report from ChoicePoint Consumer Disclosure by writing them, going online with ChoiceTrust (a division of ChoicePoint) or calling 866-527-2600.

If you are in an accident where there is an accident report taken by a law enforcement officer then the accident itself may also be on your driving record. Some states list only at-fault accidents while others list any and all accidents no matter who was at fault.

For example the NYS DMV lists an accident on records of every driver in the accident. An accident that appears on a driver record does not assign the fault to that driver. The DMV does not determine the fault in an accident. So your an insurance provider may see an accident on your driving record, if there was a crash report done, and/or a claim for an accident on your CLUE report.

If you are shopping around for insurance get low cost car insurance quotes here with us.


Categories:

Add Comment

Leave a Comment
 
 
 
0 Responses to "Is there a national data base that insurance companies utilize to track accidents? If a collision is not reported to the police, yet your provider pays off, will another provider have the ability to know if you were involved in a collision? Short of you informing them."