dcsimg
Call Us Toll Free: 1-855-430-7753

Worst states for deer collisions

By

CarInsurance.com

Odds of deer collisionA driver has a 1 in 169 chance of striking a deer in the coming year, says State Farm, the nation's largest car insurance company.

In 11 states, the odds are better than 1 in 100.

Below is a projection of deer collisions by state for the year ending June 30, 2014, estimated by State Farm, and a ranking of odds that considers the number of licensed drivers in each state.

The Insurance Information Institute offers this advice on avoiding a deer-vehicle collision:

  • Deer generally travel in herds. If you see one, others are nearby.
  • Deer crossing signs aren’t placed randomly. These are active deer crossing areas.
  • Use caution between 6 and 9 p.m., when deer are more active.
  • Use high-beam headlamps as much as possible at night, when appropriate, to illuminate the roadsides.
  • Don’t swerve if a deer collision seems inevitable. You might lose control of your vehicle or even hit another car.
  • A car-mounted deer whistle has not been proved to be effective.

Deer collisions are most common in the fall, peaking in November.

If you hit a deer, you'll need comprehensive insurance in order to make a claim for car damage.

Your chances of hitting a deer this year

Rank
State Projected collisions Chance of collision
19 Alabama 30,051 1 in 127
44 Alaska 1,100 1 in 479
50 Arizona 3,794 1 in 1,238
13 Arkansas 20,487 1 in 107
48 California 24,933 1 in 970
40 Colorado 11,601 1 in 328
36 Connecticut 9,723 1 in 256
24 Delaware 4,803 1 in 150
46 District of Columbia 546 1 in 734
47 Florida 14,823 1 in 938
21 Georgia 49,182 1 in 134
51 Hawaii 89 1 in 10,281
28 Idaho 6,372 1 in 172
31 Illinois 38,969 1 in 211
28 Indiana 31,286 1 in 172
4 Iowa 28,716 1 in 77
22 Kansas 14,731 1 in 137
13 Kentucky 27,912 1 in 107
38 Louisiana 9,783 1 in 299
24 Maine 6,702 1 in 150
17 Maryland 33,946 1 in 121
43 Massachusetts 11,250 1 in 421
11 Michigan 74,709 1 in 94
8 Minnesota 37,549 1 in 88
6 Mississippi 23,403 1 in 84
18 Missouri 34,550 1 in 124
3 Montana 10,099 1 in 75
23 Nebraska 9,210 1 in 148
49 Nevada 1,583 1 in 1,092
35 New Hampshire 4,654 1 in 229
33 New Jersey 26,860 1 in 225
45 New Mexico 2,545 1 in 562
26 New York 72,618 1 in 154
12 North Carolina 64815 1 in 103
16 North Dakota 4,207 1 in 120
19 Ohio 63,138 1 in 127
32 Oklahoma 11,287 1 in 213
37 Oregon 10,523 1 in 263
2 Pennsylvania 123,941 1 in 71
42 Rhode Island 1,833 1 in 409
10 South Carolina 37,000 1 in 93
5 South Dakota 7,420 1 in 82 
27 Tennessee 28,044 1 in 163
39 Texas 48,648 1 in 314
34 Utah 7,928 1 in 226
30 Vermont 3,029 1 in 175
9 Virginia 63,145 1 in 88
41 Washington 14,043 1 in 372
1 West Virginia 32,177 1 in 39
7 Wisconsin 47,669 1 in 85
15 Wyoming 3,849 1 in 110
Source: State Farm
Categories:

Related articles on CarInsurance.com


Comments

Tell us your thoughts

Leave a Comment
 
 
 
7 Responses to "Worst states for deer collisions"
  1. lgrant

    Have any states developed solutions that have reduced the number of deer-car accidents on their roads?

      Reply»  
  2. Fred

    Could parks and wildlife get the deer to go where I hunt? Ha!

      Reply»  
  3. Steve

    Just looking at the stats. it appears that Southern states that allow dog/deer hunting have a higher risk of car/deer collisions. Is that true?

      Reply»  
  4. Donnie Burnett

    While driving with headlights on high beams is okay, it is also one of the primary reason there are deer-car collisions. High beams, like spotlights, tend to blind deer when deer are blinded, they freeze. When the driver switches to low beam, or the road has a curve, or grade change, the dear is no longer 'blind' and tends to bolt. The vast majority of the time, it will bolt in the direction it is facing which is right into the roadway. Conduct a study and you will find that most drivers will go from high beam to low beam, or swerve slightly when they see a deer on the side of the road.

      Reply»  
  5. Dave

    Considering the number of casualties shown in the table, it is a wonder that the stupid deer have not learned to avoid traffic. Quite a few years ago, in upstate NY, on a rainy night, I hit a deer. Luckily, the damage was only $3,400. I don't know if the deer survived; it disappeared.

      Reply»  
  6. Melody

    I have hit two deer since 2007. One with a Prius in '07 had 5,000 miles on it and damage cost $3,200. Then another one with my 2008 tundra in 2009, damage minimal to truck. Deer damage --well that's a different story, it died.

      Reply»  
  7. KingofThings

    If the deer would pay attention to those signs they would be better off.

      Reply»