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Michigan

Michigan Car Insurance Rates


Michigan is known for having the most comprehensive no-fault system in the country – and in turn some of the highest state car insurance rates as well. Even a driver with a great record will pay thousands of dollars a year in many Detroit-area suburbs. Rates fall substantially in more rural areas of the state. We've got every ZIP code mapped out below.

Michigan car insurance requirements

Michigan state law requires the following minimum car insurance coverage:
Minimum bodily injury liability $20,000/$40,000
Minimum property damage liability $10,000
Personal injury protection Medical and work loss
Property protection insurance $1,000,000

Michigan Car Insurance Rates by ZIP Code & City

To learn more about the most and least expensive cities for car insurance, click the link below.
Top Cities
Car insurance rate comparison >
Priciest Neighborhoods
In Michigan
  • 48227: $4,599
    DETROIT
  • 48205: $4,404
    DETROIT
  • 48224: $4,346
    DETROIT
  • 48221: $4,314
    DETROIT
 
Cheapest Neighborhoods
In Michigan
  • 49866: $1,455
    NEGAUNEE
  • 48837: $1,496
    GRAND LEDGE
  • 48820: $1,500
    DE WITT
  • 48808: $1,500
    BATH


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What you need to know about car insurance in Michigan

Penny Gusner
CarInsurance.com
Consumer Analyst

Michigan's no-fault system provides you and your family with unlimited lifetime coverage for medical expenses resulting from an auto accident, regardless of fault. Personal injury protection (PIP) benefits also include coverage for rehabilitation, lost wages and replacement services ($20 a day for up to three years).

You also must also purchase $1 million of property protection insurance (PPI), which pays for damage your vehicle does to other people's property, such as a fence or building. It doesn't, however, pay for damage you to do to another vehicle, except legally parked cars.

Low limits of bodily injury liability and property damage liability – 20/40/10 -- must also be purchased but are referred to as residual coverage since the no-fault law protects insured drivers from being sued except in specific situations, which include:

  • If you cause an accident (in Michigan) in which someone is killed, seriously injured or permanently disfigured.
  • If you're involved in an accident (in Michigan) with a nonresident who is an occupant of a vehicle registered outside of Michigan.
  • If you're involved in an auto accident in another state.

Mini-tort: The "mini-tort" portion of the Michigan no-fault law establishes another situation in which you can sue or be sued. Under this provision, if you're 50 percent or more at fault in an accident and caused damage to another person's car and that vehicle is not completely covered by the owner's insurance policy, then you may have to pay up to $1,000 in damages.

This law also allows you to sue, or claim against, another driver who is 50 percent or more at fault for damage to your car if it isn't fully covered by your own insurance policy. You can receive up to $1,000 from the other party. If you have collision coverage, you're able to sue for your deductible amount (up to $1,000) from the other party.

A basic liability policy doesn't cover this $1,000 mini-tort liability, but you can obtain optional "limited property damage liability" coverage, for an extra cost, to cover this potential liability.

Protect your car: Since Michigan's no-fault PPI insurance only pays for damages to properly parked vehicles and the mini-tort law only allows you to sue an at-fault driver for up to $1,000 for other types of damage, it's important to carry collision coverage on your vehicle if it's newer or not easily replaced.