author-img
Written by:
Prachi Singh
Contributing Writer
Prachi is an insurance writer with a master’s degree in business administration. Through her writing, she hopes to help readers make smart and informed decisions about their finances. She loves to travel and write poetry.
author
Reviewed by:
Laura Longero
reviewer icon
Executive Editor
Laura is an award-winning editor with experience in content and communications covering auto insurance and personal finance. She has written for several media outlets, including the USA Today Network. She most recently worked in the public sector for the Nevada Department of Transportation.

If your points on your driver’s license or driving record will be removed, and if so, how often will depend upon your state’s laws. You should be able to get specific information from your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles or like state agency on how points are accumulated and removed from a person’s driving history.

For examples of how some states handle DMV points, see below:

Pennsylvania allows points to be removed from your driving record for safe driving. You can get 3 points removed from your driving history every 12 consecutive months (from the date of the last violation) if you go without a violation, which results in points, license suspension, or revocation.

Furthermore, in PA, once a driving record is reduced to zero and remains at zero points for 12 consecutive months, any further accumulation of points is treated as the first accumulation of points.

Utah’s points system allows for when you drive one full year without a moving traffic violation conviction, one-half of your accumulated points to be removed from your driving record. All points are deleted if you drive for two straight years without a conviction. Otherwise, individual convictions are automatically removed 3 years after the date of the violation.

In New York State, the DMV computer system automatically calculates your point total when you are assigned points on your license for a moving violation. Your point total is the number of driver violation points you received during the 18 previous months.

Points are counted from the dates of your traffic violations, not the dates of your traffic convictions. A traffic conviction is required for the points to appear on your driver’s record. Eighteen (18) months after the date of the violation, the points for that violation are removed from your point total. The convictions remain on your record.

Michelle Megna contributed to this story.

Resources & Methodology

Sources

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. “The Pennsylvania point fact sheet.” Accessed January 2023.

Utah Point System. “Utah Department of Public Safety.” Accessed January 2023.

New York Department of Motor Vehicles. “New York State driver point system.” Accessed January 2023.

Laura Longero

Ask the Insurance Expert

Laura Longero

Executive Editor

Laura is an award-winning editor with experience in content and communications covering auto insurance and personal finance. She has written for several media outlets, including the USA Today Network. She most recently worked in the public sector for the Nevada Department of Transportation.

John McCormick

Ask the Insurance Expert

John McCormick

Editorial Director

John is the editorial director for CarInsurance.com, Insurance.com and Insure.com. Before joining QuinStreet, John was a deputy editor at The Wall Street Journal and had been an editor and reporter at a number of other media outlets where he covered insurance, personal finance, and technology.

Leslie Kasperowicz

Ask the Insurance Expert

Leslie Kasperowicz

Managing Editor

Leslie Kasperowicz is an insurance educator and content creation professional with nearly two decades of experience first directly in the insurance industry at Farmers Insurance and then as a writer, researcher, and educator for insurance shoppers writing for sites like ExpertInsuranceReviews.com and InsuranceHotline.com and managing content, now at CarInsurance.com.

Nupur Gambhir

Ask the Insurance Expert

Nupur Gambhir

Managing Editor

Nupur Gambhir is a content editor and licensed life, health, and disability insurance expert. She has extensive experience bringing brands to life and has built award-nominated campaigns for travel and tech. Her insurance expertise has been featured in Bloomberg News, Forbes Advisor, CNET, Fortune, Slate, Real Simple, Lifehacker, The Financial Gym, and the end-of-life planning service.

Please Enter Valid Question. Min 50 to max 250 characters are allowed. Only (& ? , .) charcters are allowed.
Please Enter Valid Email.
Error: Security check failed
Thank You, Your message has been received. Our team of auto insurance experts typically answers questions within five working days. Note that due to the volume of questions we receive, not all may be answered. Due to technical error, please try again later.
Get quotes near you!
Please enter valid zip
author image
Contributing Writer

Prachi is an insurance writer with a master’s degree in business administration. Through her writing, she hopes to help readers make smart and informed decisions about their finances. She loves to travel and write poetry.