Driving without a valid driver's license is a serious offense that can result in jail time and higher insurance rates. Charges for driving without a license vary by state, but there are usually hefty fines involved if you get caught by law enforcement.

It turns out that there is a good reason to keep unlicensed drivers off the road – they are much more dangerous than licensed drivers. According to the NHTSA, 19% of motor vehicle fatalities involved drivers with invalid licenses. Furthermore, drivers with invalid licenses comprised 13% of all drivers in fatal crashes.

Keep reading to find out everything you need to know about driving without a license, the punishment for driving without a license in your state and how it will affect your auto insurance.

Key Highlights
  • Driving without a driver's license or a suspended or revoked license is illegal in all 50 states.
  • Penalties for driving with a suspended or revoked license vary by state.
  • Driving with a suspended or revoked license will usually result in a heavy fine of up to $25,000, depending on your state.

Is it illegal to drive without a license?

Driving without a driver's license or a suspended or revoked license is illegal in all 50 states. In most states, the first offense is a misdemeanor. If you get a second offense, it can be a felony.

The penalty for driving with a suspended license first offense can range from a license suspension for two months on the low end up to a year. If it's a second offense, you will probably be hoofing it for at least one to two years. There is also a good chance your vehicle will be impounded, or your license plate confiscated.

Jail time (up to five years) is a very real possibility for anything other than a first offense, as is community service. Furthermore, your driving record will now have a misdemeanor listed on it.

If you have never had a license, the penalties are likely to be less severe, but it is still a misdemeanor.

What happens if you drive without a license?

The penalty for driving without a license will vary depending on a variety of factors including what state you live in, whether your license was suspended or revoked and whether this was a first offense. In almost all cases, drivers face hefty fees that can easily exceed $1,000, a suspension or revocation of their license and possible jail time.

Here is a breakdown by state of what happens if you get pulled over without a license, according to 2021 data from the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Driving Without a License Penalties State by State
States Citation Penalties

Alabama

§32-6-19

Misdemeanor: $100-$500 fine; additional fine of $50; imprisonment for no more than 180 days; immediate vehicle impoundment; possible license suspension increase by 6 months.

Alaska

§28.15.291

(First Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: 10 day suspended imprisonment provided at least 80 hours of community service are completed; possible forfeiture of vehicle; license suspension increased by at least 90 days.

(Subsequent Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for at least 10 days; possible forfeiture of vehicle; license suspension increased by at least 90 days.

Arizona

§28-3473

§28-3511

§13-707

Class 1 Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for up to 6 months; possible vehicle impoundment.

Arkansas

§27-16-303

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 2 days and 6 months; possible fine of not more than $500.

California

Veh. Code

§14601

§14602.6

(First Offense): Imprisonment for between 5 days and 6 months; $300-$1000 fine.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for between 10 days and 1 year; $500-$2000 fine.

Colorado

§42-2-138

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 6 months; fine of no more than $500; license suspension increased by 1 year.

(Subsequent Offense): Driver ineligible to be issued a driver’s license for a period of three years.

Connecticut

§14-215

§14-227h

(First Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 3 months, $150-$200 fine, or both.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 1 year, $200-$600 fine, or both.

Delaware

21 Del. C. §2756

(First Offense): Imprisonment for between 30 days and 6 months; $500-$1,000 fine; possible vehicle impoundment of at least 90 days.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for between 60 days and 1 year; $1,000-$4,000 fine; possible vehicle impoundment of at least 1 year.

District of Columbia

ND.C. Code Ann.

§ 50-1403.01

Imprisonment for no more than 1 year, fine of no more than $2,500, or both.

Florida

§ 322.34

§ 775.082

§ 775.083

(First Offense) 2nd Degree Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 60 days or $500 fine.

(Second Offense) 1st Degree Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 1 year or $1,000 fine.

(Subsequent Offense) 3rd Degree Felony: Imprisonment for no more than 5 years or $5,000 fine. Offenders must be imprisoned for a minimum of 10 days.

Immediate vehicle impoundment.

Georgia

§40-5-121

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 2 days and 1 year; possible additional fine of no more than $500.

(Second or Third Offenses) High and Aggravated Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 10 days and 1 year; possible additional fine of $1,000-$2,500.

(Fourth or Subsequent Offenses) Felony: Imprisonment for 1-5 years; possible addition fine of $2,500-$5,000.

License suspension increase of 6 months. Reinstatement fees of:

(First Offense): $210, or $200 if paid by mail.

(Second Offense) $310, or $300 if paid by mail.

(Subsequent Offenses) $410, or $400 if paid by mail.

Guam

No Information

Hawaii

§291E-62

*This statute applies to drivers who have had their license revoked, suspended, or cancelled due to a charge of Driving Under the Influence, (DUI)

(First Offense): Imprisonment for 3-30 days; $250-$1,000 fine; license suspension increased by 1 year; additional, inapplicable penalties.

(Second Offense): Imprisonment for 30 days; $1,000 fine; license suspension increased by 2 years; additional, inapplicable penalties.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for 1 year; $2,000 fine; permanent license revocation; Additional, inapplicable penalties.

Idaho

§18-8001

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 2 days and 6 months; fine of no more than $1,000; license suspension increased by 180 days.

(Second Offense): Imprisonment for between 20 days and 1 year; fine of no more than $1,000; license suspension increased by 1 year.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for between 30 days and 1 year; fine of no more than $3,000; license suspension increased by 2 years.

Illinois

625 ILCS

5/6-303

730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-55

730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-45

(First Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 1 year; fine of no more than $2,500.

(Subsequent Offense) Class 4 Felony: Imprisonment for 1-3 years; fine of up to $25,000.

Possible vehicle impoundment.

(Fourth or Subsequent Offenses): Possible seizure of license plate; possible vehicle immobilization.

Indiana

Ind. Code Ann.

§ 9-30-10-16

§ 35-50-2-7

Class 6 Felony: Imprisonment for between 6 months and 2 years, 6 months; fine of no more than $10,000.

Iowa

§321.218

Simple Misdemeanor: $250-$1,500 fine; license suspension increased for an additional like period or for one year, whichever is shorter.

Kansas

§8-262

(First Offense) Class B Nonperson Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for at least 5 days; fine of at least $100.

(Subsequent Offense) Class A Nonperson Misdemeanor: Imprisonment without eligibility for parole until completion of 5 days; fine of at least $100.

License suspension increased by 90 days.

Kentucky

§ 186.620

§189A.090

§532.020

(First Offense) Class B Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for at least 90 days; license suspension increased by 6 months.

(Second Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 90 days and 1 year; license suspension increased by 1 year.

(Third or Subsequent Offense) Class D Felony: Imprisonment for 1-5 years; license suspension revoked for additional 2 years.

Louisiana

§32:415

Person with a Class D or E driver’s license: Imprisonment for no more than 6 months, fine of no more than $500, or both.

Person with a Class A, B, or C driver’s license: Imprisonment for no more than 6 months, fine of no more than $5,000, or both.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for between 7 days and 6 months; fine of $300-$500; potential civil fine of no more than $1,150.

(Subsequent Offense) Class A, B, or C driver’s license: Imprisonment for between 7 days and 6 months; fine of $300-$500; potential civil fine of no more than $2,500.

License suspension increased by 1 year.

Maine

Title 29-A

§2412-A

Class E Crime

(First Offense): $250.

(Second Offense): $500.

Possible license suspension of 1 year.

Maryland

§16-303

§16-402

§ 27-101

§ 27-111

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 1 year, fine of no more than $1,000, or both; possible license suspension increased by no more than 1 year.

(Subsequent Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 2 years, fine of no more than $1,000, or both; possible license suspension increased by no more than 18 months if second offense, no more than 2 years for subsequent offenses.

Possible vehicle impoundment.

Massachusetts

Ch. 90; §23

(First Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 10 days, $500-$1,000 fine, or both

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for between 60 days and 1 year.

License suspension increased by 60 days.

Michigan

§257.904

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 93 days, a fine of no more than $500, or both.

(Second Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 1 year, a fine of no more than $1,000, or both.

Cancellation of vehicle’s registration plates.

License suspension increased by like period.

Minnesota

§171.24

§609.02

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 90 days, fine of no more than $1,000, or both.

Mississippi

§63-11-40

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 48 hours and 6 months; $200-$500 fine; license suspension increased by 6 months.

Missouri

§302.321

(First Offense) Class D Misdemeanor: No set term of imprisonment; not to exceed one year.

(Second Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for between 6 months and 1 year.

(Subsequent Offense) Class E Felony: Imprisonment for no more than 4 years.

Montana

§61-5-212

§61-5-102

(First Offense): Fine of no more than $500.

(Second Offense): Imprisonment for between 2 days and 6 months; fine of no more than $500; license suspension increased by 1 year.

Nebraska

§60-4,108

(First Offense) Class II Misdemeanor: Unable to operate any motor vehicle for 1 year; license revocation for like period.

(Second or Third Offense) Class II Misdemeanor: Unable to operate any motor vehicle for 2 year; license revocation for like period.

(Fourth or Subsequent Offense) Class I Misdemeanor: Unable to operate any motor vehicle for 2 year; license revocation for like period.

Nevada

§483.560

§193.150

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 6 months, a fine of no more than $1,000, or both.

If license (suspended), extension of suspension by like period.

If license (revoked), extension of period of ineligibility for license by 1 year.

If license (restricted), revocation of restricted license and extension of period of ineligibility for a license, permit or privilege to drive for 1 year.

These terms are to run consecutively.

New Hampshire

§263:64

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for at least 1 week; fine of no more than $1,000; license suspension increased by 1 year.

New Jersey

N.J.S.A.

39:3-40

(First Offense): $500 fine.

(Second Offense): Imprisonment for 1-5 days; $750 fine.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for 10 days; $1,000 fine.

License suspension increased by no more than 6 months.

New Mexico

§66-5-39

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for 4-364 days; possible fine of no more than $1,000.

Possible vehicle immobilization.

New York

V&T 511

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 30 days, $200-$500 fine, or both.

(Subsequent Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 180 days; fine of no less than $500.

North Carolina

§20-28

N.C.G.S.A.

§15A-1340.23

(First Offense) Class 3 Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for 1-10 days; fine of no more than $200; license suspension increased by 1 year.

(Second Offense): License suspension increased by 2 years.

(Third Offense): Permanent license suspension.

North Dakota

§39-06-42

§ 12.1-32-01

(First, Second or Third Offense) Class B Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 30 days, $1,500 fine, or both.

(Fourth or Subsequent Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 1 year, $3,000 fine, or both.

Possible destruction of license plate.

Ohio

§4507.02

(First Offense) Unclassified Misdemeanor: Fine of no more than $1,000; 500 hours community service.

(Subsequent Offense) 1st Degree Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 180 days; $1,000 fine.

Possible license plate impoundment.

Oklahoma

Title 47:

§6-303

Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 30 days, $50-$300 fine, or both.

(First Offense): $100-$500 fine.

(Second Offense): $200-$750 fine.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 1 year, $300-$1,000 fine, or both.

Oregon

Or. Rev. Stat. Ann.

§ 811.175

Class A Traffic Infraction: $220-$2,000 fine.

Possible vehicle impoundment.

Pennsylvania

75 Pa. CSA

§1543

First Violation: Summary Offense; $200 fine; license suspension increased by 1 year if originally suspended, 2 years if it was originally revoked.

Second Violation: Summary offense; fine of $1,000; imprisonment for no less than 90 days.

Subsequent Violation: 3rd Degree Misdemeanor; fine of $2,500; imprisonment for no less than 6 months.

Puerto Rico

No Information

Rhode Island

§31-11-18

HB 7679 (2016)

(First Offense) Violation: $250-$500 fine.

(Second Offense): $350-$500 fine

(Subsequent Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for up to 90 days, $500-$1,000 fine, or both and license suspension up to 90 days.

South Carolina

§56-1-460

(First Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 30 days, $300 fine, or both.

(Second Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 60 days, $600 fine, or both.

(Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 90 days; $1,000 fine.

South Dakota

§32-12-65

(Revoked) Class 1 Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 1 year; fine of no more than $2,000.

(Suspended or Cancelled) Class 2 Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 30 days; fine of no more than $500.

Tennessee

§55-12-131

§55-50-504

(Non-Resident) Class B Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for not more than 6 months, fine of no more than $500, or both.

(Resident) (First Offense) Class B Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for not more than 6 months, fine of no more than $500, or both; license suspension increased by like period of time.

(Resident) (Subsequent Offense) Class A Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for not more than 11 months, 29 days, fine of no more than $2,500, or both; license suspension increased by like period of time.

Texas

Tex. Transp. Code Ann.

§ 521.457

Tex. Penal Code Ann.

§ 12.23

§12.22

(First Offense) Class C Misdemeanor: Fine of no more than $500.

(Subsequent Offense) Class B Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 180 days, fine of no more than $2,000, or both.

Utah

§53-3-227

§76-3-301

Class B Misdemeanor: Imprisonment of no more than 6 months; $1,000 fine.

Vermont

§674

(First Offense): Imprisonment for no more than 2 years, fine of no more than $5,000, or both.

(Sixth or Subsequent Offense): Imprisonment for no more 2 years, fine of $5,000, or both.

Possible seizure of license plates.

Virginia

§46.2-301.1

§18.2-11

Class 1 Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 12 months, fine of no more than $2,500, or both. Vehicle may be impounded for up to 90 days.

Washington

§46.20.345

Gross Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for no more than 364 days, fine of no more than $5,000, or both.

West Virginia

W. Va. Code Ann.

§ 17B-4-3

(First Offense) Misdemeanor: $100-$500 fine.

(Second Offense) Misdemeanor: $100-$500 fine.

(Third or Subsequent Offense) Misdemeanor: Imprisonment for 30-90 days; $150-$500 fine.

Wisconsin

§343.44

(Suspended): $50-$200 fine.

(Revoked): Fine of no more than $2,500.

Vehicle may be impounded.

Wyoming

§31-7-134

§31-4-104

Misdemeanor: Fine of no more than $750, or both.

Source

What's the difference between a suspended license and a revoked license?

Driving with a suspended or revoked license is unwise but in most cases, driving with a revoked license is the more serious offense. Here's a quick overview of these two violations.

What is a license suspension?

A suspended license is a temporary loss of your driving privileges often due to an excessive amount of points on your license, driving without proof of insurance, or another major offense. In some states, the suspension ends automatically, and your license is reinstated. In other states, you may have to apply to your DMV to have the suspension lifted.

There can be factors that lessen the severity of driving on a suspended license and one of these is whether or not you knew you were driving on a suspended license.

Arion Hunt, founder of the Arion Hunt Law Firm
Arion Hunt
Founder of the Arion Hunt Law Firm in Orlando, Florida

"When it comes to driving without a license in Florida, the first offense is often ‘without knowledge,’ which means the driver didn't know that their license was suspended," says Arion Hunt. "This carries a civil infraction moving violation penalty similar to a speeding ticket.”

There are a few different reasons you could be unaware that your license is suspended and not know it – usually because of unpaid traffic tickets.

Derek Andrews with Phelan
Derek Andrews
Phelan & Danek in Albany, New York.

"I would say that the vast majority of drivers charged with this crime are surprised to learn their license is suspended, and all of them are shocked to learn of its consequences", says Derek Andrews with Phelan.

Every state law is different in how it deals with driving on a suspended or revoked license and while Florida may give you the benefit of the doubt that you were unaware of the suspended status of your license, not every state will extend that courtesy.

On the other hand, if you know your license is suspended and decide to drive, the penalties become exponentially steeper.

What if your license is revoked?

This is the more serious of the two infractions. It means that your license has been canceled, which usually is because of a serious infraction, such as a DUI.

The penalty for driving with a suspended or revoked license varies by state, but in most cases, a hefty fine is involved, ranging up to $25,000. Your suspension time will be increased and you’ll face the possibility of serving time in jail, which varies by the offense and the laws in your state.

In most states, driving with a suspended or revoked license is a misdemeanor for a first offense. When you are a repeat offender with a second or third offense, you may be looking at a felony and will almost certainly be spending some time behind bars.

"A driver who continues to drive on a suspended license gets labeled ‘habitual’ and faces felony charges, a $5,000 fine, five years of jail, and parole. A judge can also order additional requirements on a case-by-case basis," Hunt says.

Can you get car insurance without a license?

The answer to this question is yes, but it can be difficult. If you don't have a license or currently have a suspended, revoked, or expired license you may still need insurance for a variety of reasons.

Here are a couple of reasons you may need car insurance coverage without a license:

  • You have an underaged driver in the house: Most insurance companies will not let a driver under 18 purchase insurance coverage on their own because they cannot legally enter into a contract so if you have a teen child in the house who drives you still need insurance coverage regardless of whether or not you drive.
  • You have a personal driver or caregiver: If you have lost your license or can no longer drive due to health reasons you may need a personal driver and if they are driving your car, you will need that car to be insured.

A primary driver can be anyone that is licensed and will be driving your car on a regular basis. It can be a spouse, teenager, or even a roommate or caretaker. However, the premium will be based on the primary driver's record so choose someone with a decent driving record to keep your premiums affordable.

You may need to list yourself as an excluded driver on the policy. Then, if you decide to drive, you will have no coverage and will be responsible for any damage to your car as well as other people and their vehicles in case of a crash.

Can you get insurance with a suspended license?

You may still be able to get auto insurance with a suspended license, but it will be expensive and you'll have to meet certain conditions. If you don't currently have a policy and your license is suspended, you can still apply for coverage. But you will have to get a policy from a car insurance company that accepts high-risk drivers.

You will also need to show that your license suspension is for a short period of time, say, 30 days compared to a year. Once your driving privileges are restored, you will have to show proof of reinstatement to your insurer.

If you have a long-term suspension, you have the option of finding a car insurance company that will allow you to buy a policy with another person named as the primary driver. You would not be listed on the policy until you get your license back.

Insurance companies are required to send you a notice informing you that your coverage is to be suspended at some future date, typically at least 30 days out.

Learn more about Can I get a license in another state if my license is suspended?

Can insurance companies tell if your license has been suspended?

Insurance companies are not normally notified if your license is suspended. Insurers pull your driver history from the DMV and they have to pay for that record so insurers don't necessarily pull it at every renewal period if you've had a clean record for years.

Insurance companies are usually not even aware that you need an SR-22 unless you tell them. Your driving record with a DUI or suspended license may make them ask if you need one, but the DMV doesn't normally alert insurers, it's your job as the one needing it.

The burden of telling the insurer about a suspended or canceled license is yours. It is written into some policies that if your license is suspended you must inform your insurer within a certain time period, such as 30 or 60 days.

Will you pay a higher insurance premium after driving with a suspended license?

In addition to the fines for driving without a valid license, you can expect your insurance rates to increase. Driving with a suspended or revoked license is severely frowned upon by insurers, as they deem it high-risk behavior, so expect your rates to climb.

Sa El, co-founder of Simply Insurance
Sa El
Co-founder of Simply Insurance

"Rates can easily increase anywhere between 25% to 30% when an insurance company sees that you were arrested for driving with a suspended or revoked license", advises Sa El.

If your license is suspended or revoked for a long time – six months to a year or more – it will only increase your insurance pain. If your license has been suspended for a long period, expect your insurer to cancel your policy once it learns of the suspension.

This gap in coverage can lead to higher rates when you apply for coverage again as insurance companies hate to see a gap in coverage.

Frequently asked questions: Suspended licenses and revoked licenses

Can you drive without a license in your possession?

The penalty for driving without a license or expired license in your possession isn’t as serious as driving with a suspended or revoked license. While you will most likely get a ticket, it is a traffic infraction, not a misdemeanor.

If you show up at court with your valid driver's license, there is a good chance the ticket will be dismissed, although you may need to pay a fine.

How much will you pay if you get pulled over for driving without a license?

How much driving without a license will end up costing depends on a number of factors. The state you are driving in, whether your license is suspended or revoked and if it is the first offense will all impact the fine if you get pulled over for driving without a license.

Fines can range from $50 in Wisconsin if you are driving on a suspended license all the way up to $25,000 if you are caught for the second time in Illinois, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures or NCSL.

While it varies by state, in general, expect fines to range up to $1,000 for a first offense, the fine for a second offense can easily be $2,500 or more.

What is the penalty for driving without a license if you’re under 18?

In most states, the same penalties will apply regardless of your age. If a minor has a valid license and forgot it at home, a traffic ticket and a fine will be the most likely penalty.

However, they will be looking at a much bigger penalty if they decide to take a car out for a spin with a suspended or revoked license. In most states, the first offense is a misdemeanor and comes with a hefty fine.

Many states suspend a license for a certain number of months when a person is caught driving without a license, this penalty will most likely be applied to a teen as well, delaying their right to get a license for the same amount of time.

What happens if an unlicensed driver drives your car?

Never let an unlicensed driver get behind the wheel of your car. The penalty for letting an unlicensed driver drive your car can be severe. Car insurance follows the car, so if an unlicensed friend or family member gets into an accident with your car, it will be your insurance policy that has to pay.

Unfortunately, since an unlicensed driver was behind the wheel, your insurance company has the legal grounds to deny your claim since the majority of policies have a clause that states that the driver must have a valid license.

So, you’ll be legally responsible to pay for the other driver’s car, medical bills and legal defense if they decide to sue you. In some states, you can be charged if you knowingly allow someone without a valid license to drive your vehicle resulting in jail time, large fines and car impoundment.

You also can expect a dramatic increase in your insurance costs or cancellation of your policy, which can make finding a new policy challenging and expensive.

Can you get a hardship license if your license is suspended?

If your license is suspended, there may be a way to get back on the road with a hardship license, which is issued when your standard driver's license has been revoked or suspended. It allows you to drive, but only under certain circumstances and for approved reasons, mainly to get back and forth to work.

A hardship license will come with a wide variety of restrictions that depend on your particular state. In most cases, you can only drive to approved locations, usually work, daycare or school, and a few stores for errands. Many states assign a nighttime curfew.

Getting caught driving after hours or for unapproved reasons will result in your hardship license being revoked. You may not even get a second chance, depending on the state laws

Most states don't offer second chances.

Resources & Methodology

Sources:

  1. National Conference of State Legislatures. “Driving While Revoked, Suspended or Otherwise Unlicensed: Penalties by State.” Accessed July 2022.
  2. AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. “Unlicensed to Kill.” Accessed July 2022.
  3. U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts: Driver License Compliance Status in Fatal Crashes.” Accessed July 2022.
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Mark Vallet
Contributing Researcher

Mark Vallet is a professional freelance writer who specializes in automotive and insurance writing and regularly contributes to CarInsurance.com. He lives in Colorado with his wife and children.